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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)
. we need china's support because chinese banks are harboring some of the ill-gotten gains, the illicit gains of north korea. and if china wanted really to put the screws for kim jong-un and his inner circle they could tighten up some of those bank accounts overnight and would send a very quick swift signal that there is a price to be paid for provocation, and if you want to deal with the world as it is, you're going to convoy from this provocation and a different direction, even if you can't open up your country overnight without reform. anyway, we have to remain open to real change. we do need a political exit ramp eventually from this horror story in north korea, not to suggest we're trying to seek rapid regime change. we are not seeking more. we are not seek rapid regime change. win a silver light on old measures, but we do have to bring all of these instruments of policy to bear in a more effective strategy. in china, which has to be fitting on a new assessment of north korea. it's north korean ally. on the one hand, they may be saying yes, north korea's nuclear weapons state and a
how china will surpass us. he said that in the florida senate in 2011 and how we need each other. but that's diplomacy comest you can get a bit of a pass. senator hagel, key was had by the executive commission on china, but talk solely about development issues. rule of law and economic growth is fine. but that's not the job he's getting. he said absolutely nothing about the rise of china. he's also said absolutely nothing about he has had the defense department is going to do with the rise of china in an era of budget cuts to the defense department he supports. it's very troubling, fred has a great way of putting this consensus reality that in a sense it doesn't matter. so did not do the job better and you can take that for granted. japan for the first time in a decade has not just her and run defense budget, modestly $1.6 billion increase. it would be nice to see it continue, but everyone watches very carefully to see the leading indicator, which is us and what we're willing to do. taiwan is a country rushing to the exit to make sure nothing comes between it and china and theref
in the pacific. not just about china, but about some of the intraasian problem that is we're seeing. and if you can doing what our economists at aei absolutely revile, link it back to some of of the, you know, economic questions that we face and the prosperity that we've gotten used to up to a point? >> thanks. well, first,ing now you know how asia feels in these discussions, always sort of last, and when attention comes, it's sort of quick. [laughter] >> this is why you grew a beard. >> exactly. let me, let me mention three things. that i think will be on the radar that we should be aware of. and then link it, actually, back to the broader discussion, what dani asked about the economics. um, so, you know, if tom was talking about the immediate game and fred was talking about the short-term game, asia sees itself as the long-term game. and they sue -- they view what's going on there in those terms. of it's not something that -- well, whatever i'm about to mention, they don't think it's going to be resolved tomorrow. they don't think that the trends they're dealing with are at any point in time
wonder if you just talk a little bit about what we see in the pacific, not just about china, but about some of the inner asian problems that we are seeing. and if you can, doing what our comments today are talking about, linking it back to some of the economic questions that we face in the prosperity that we have gotten used to up to a point. >> well, first of all, we know how asia feels in this discussion. when attention comes, it is very quick and it's get it over with as soon as you can. >> this is why you grow a beard. [laughter] >> let me mention three things. three things that will be on the radar we should be aware of here in washington dc. then we can actually get back to the broader discussion. so if tom was talking about the media game, asia sees itself as a long-term game. they view what is going on here in those terms. it's not something -- they don't think it's going to be resolved tomorrow. whether it's not just china, it's japan and india, at southeast asia looking over long-term to understand what the correlation and balance of power is going to become. so part of the f
a strong case that china's army's behind most of the attacks on the american government and companies. chinese officials have denied the accusations but the u.s. government remains suspicious of state involvement. president obama recently expresd concern over the ability of foreign hackers to compromise critical american infrastructure the pentagon is planning a range of defensive measures including a massive expansion of its own signer security force. joining me to discuss the developing background is david sanger of the "new york times." he cowrote today's front page story on the subject. joining us later is dune lawrence of bloomberg businessweek if and michael riley of bloomberg. they are learning everything they could. >> so far it's clear they've been into those systems it's not clear they've ever done anything to them. >> rose: why -- >> that's the remarkable question charlie. always the issue is intent and the degree to which the political leadership in china actually is knowledgeable about this and to what degree of control it has over it. because chinese command and contro
to touch someone quickly. this also is necessary in the western pacific where china, for example, has 80 sub marines just to our 50. even john mccain who was quite critical in the hearing said this nomination should go through. >> right. >> well, yeah. on that point, it looks like the nomination will be confirmed. the problem is it loonlgs like there's a filibuster or attempt at a filibuster and that means democrats and the white house have to come up with 60 votes to get this through. mccain has indicated to break a filibuster. looks like they would have the votes to do that. do you think we have sort of crossed a line here, bad precedent set for future cabinet nominations? never before has there been a filibuster of a defense secretary nominee. only two rejected since 1959. nobody tried to filibuster one in that time. are we creating bad precedent? >> why the senate has the right as a senator said who is supporting senator hagel to do a filibuster. i think it would set a bad precedent because as many people often very conservative have said in this particular case, the president has th
countries-pat spoke with leaders about her husband's upcoming tariff to -- trip to china, explaining he was trying to open a dialogue, and she reiterate america's promise of financial assistance and announced the creation of two grad walt scholarships for women to travel to the united states to study. not her official pronouncements that earned her the accolades, either in the country she visit or back home. it was her warmth, enthusiasm, general win appreciation of and affection for the people she met in monrovia, she said she could not wait to meet people. she did that. she waded into crowds, shaking hands, and giving hugs. at the inauguration ceremony she gave the president a cheek-to-cheek embrace. he called her, quote, woman with strength of spirit and fortitude of character, when a group of women presented her with cloths, rather than just slipping it under her chair, she stood up and began to tie it around her waste. the women got up and came up to help her and dressed her in the traditional clothing. pat's delight in her outfit and her willingness to 0 model spoke volumes out ab
coincided with an investigation it did that found relatives of wen jiabao, china's prime minister, had accumulated several billion dollars through their business dealings. for more on all this, i am joined by "new york times" reporter, nicole perlroth, who reported the story in today's paper. and grady summers, vice president of mandiant, the cyber security company hired by the "times" to investigate the breach. nicole perlroth, let's start with you. how did the paper realize that it was under attack and could it immediately move to defend itself? >> we were actually -- this was a proactive effort by the "new york times." we knew the story was coming out. we knew there had been warnings about publication of the investigation into wen jiabao's relatives would quote/unquote have consequences. so our security team notified at&t which monitors our network full time to look out for unusual activity and we notified them a day before the story published and the day the story went online at&t got back to us and said that they had noticed that at least three of our computers were communicating
are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we are now into a second term. what do we mean by lighter footprint? >> well, if we step back on that, at the beginning of 2012, the president after a multimonth review, close consultation with the uniformed military, the joint chief, service secretaries and combatant commanders around the world put together a new defense strategy. that defense strategy had to take into account that the budget control act required the defense budget over ot next ten years to be reduced by $500 million or so, a little less than that. and which would require a 5% decrease over what were the plans. and in doing that the president asked the military to think about what the new challenges were going to be. what were the real challenges we were going to face. and that defense strategy was comprehensive. and it had vari
to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea and the conversation was completely different. was about global trade and freeing trade. and i actually always thought that in that sense the country had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. it is how they perceive themselves as a state of development and significance there. i think it is because if you look at the places like chile now quite developed in many ways, colombia getting there in terms of the development, a country like brazil was interesting because on the one hand, it is leading the global, one of the leaders in the global economy, but with huge income distribution, difficulties that keep it really more on developing countryside. if you look at some of the poorest countries in the central america like a guatemala for instance, you are talking about places you can't reach the farmers in the high land by the highway, and so their problems are to try to build infrastructure so that they can july and the 20th century economy cannot forget the 21st century economy
, and china has one carrier, that is from the ukrainian navy. i don't know how good they feel about serving in this aircraft carrier, that is exactly what they had. we have over 200 bases and facilities, china has nothing outside of china itself. .. the kid saved a couple hundred billion dollars over the next ten years by reducing that to reasonable 360,000 soldiers. so there are just some of the things that could be done that could get you to that trillion dollars figure that people say would really disarmed the united states. no, it wouldn't. now, 4,807,000,000,000 has already been agreed to by the senate and house of the next ten years of sequestration that would involve another 4,902,000,000,000 which would get you close to trillion, but there won't be a sequestration. so that kind of cutback we will see, and we don't see anyone in the pentagon really working toward this. leon panetta has never really asked for it. so this creates a serious problem. now, demilitarization is a more important issue because what we have done is militarize the entire national security process i have a chapt
with the hardware that we buy today, all the products are being made in china or thailand. there is something that can be put into that. it is hard to get out of there. stuff we are getting all over america is a problem. it is the hardware. everything comes from china. we have to stop that. guest: he is partly correct. not everything comes from china, and there are other threats. you're absolutely right, that hard were developed through these long international supply chains, is an enormous problem. we at the internet security alliance had been working on a program to develop a mechanism to better manage the hardware development process. the key here is economics. the reason why we have these long supply chains, in china, and compromises can be put into hardware throughout that supply chain, and the reason we have it is because it is so economical. you cannot compete in the market unless you're accessing these long international supply chains. we have to find a way to secure this system, understanding we may have some insecure parts to the system. we can do those sorts of things. the key is n
heart targeted by hackers. those companies pointing the finger at china for a new string of cybercrimes. fox business network's peter barnes joins us for this. peter, everything is okay in your twitter account and in peter barnes's world? >> reporter: i don't even know what my handle is. jenna: that is good place to start. that way nothing can be stolen. we hear about different hacking taking place at different times. how concerned is wash ton really about this latest spring of reports?. >> reporter: very concerned. the administration appears to be getting ready to get tougher on china over all this computer hacking. a new government intelligence report in fact to be released shortly is expected to call the rise in chinese cyber attacks a threat to the u.s. and its economy. the moves come after "the washington post", "the new york times" and "the wall street journal" announced recent attacks on their computer systems suspected of original senating from china. social media site twitter as you say said friday dreamly sophisticated hackers from an unidentified source may have stolen the us
. if we could get the economy rolling, if we could get china and other countries that take the business away that we've just handed them on the silver platter and get our country great again. because it's not great right now. then that would take care of a lot of problems, but we're not doing that. you look at what's going on in india, china, so many countries, you look at what opec is doing to us, greta, with fuel. i see on your show, and on other shows where fuel is going to be setting records, records in terms of what's happening, and opec is laughing all the way to the bank. you look at what's happening with this countries, and we're just not going to come back. as somebody that knows what they're doing is in there. >> you used the term ashamed. that we should be ashamed of ourselves unless somebody knows what he's doing is doing the work. i'm curious, why are we in this mess? is it because of incompetence, lack of understanding and it's politics, about winning or a complicated issue? why are we in this mess? >> i think you could say it's all of the above, it's interesting and we're
of the kind of things you want to see, cap and trade or perhaps a carbon tax or things like that. china and india continue to add a power plant, essentially, every week. so, do you look at that and say climate change is going to happen, no matter what at this point? >> well, some climate change is already happening and will continue to happen. the physics of the problem are quite challenging. we put, well, 85% of the internal used by earth inc., it comes from fossil fuels. and the combustion of those fuels results in us putting 90 million tons of heat-trapping pollution into the atmosphere every day, as if it's an open sewer. it does obey the laws of physics. it traps enough extra energy every day to equal the amount in 400,000 hiroshima atomic bombs. filling the sky with a lot more water vapor and these great basins of water vapor in the sky are now filled or overflowing. you get the kind of downpours in my home city in nashville where thousands lost their homes and businesses and had no flood insurance because it was a once in a 1,000-year event. yesterday in australia 2.5 feet of rai
's different? we have seen an enormous increase in the u.s. trade deficit, especially with countries like china. today, they happened to release a report that looked at the effect of currency manipulation, perhaps the single most important factor and explain the growth of our trade deficit. eliminating the trade deficit or eliminating currency manipulation could reduce the trade as a by roughly $190-$490 billion. doing this would increase manufacturing employment by up to 1 million jobs. that's a big downpayments in the whole we have created in manufacturing and employment. one thing we need to do is create demand. that is what we did do but we did not do that in the last decade. we need to shift the demand to domestic produced goods resulting in the hiring of domestic workers. manufacturing jobs are amongst the best for workers especially for those without a college degree. high wages, good benefits. >> bruce, you worked in washington, d.c., and brookings is right off dupont. >> i am mostly on a plane. >> industrial policy is a dirty word. if you go to any other domestic place, it will land yo
on china and threats from terrorists and rogue nations. he will be speaking at george washington university, and that starts at 6:30 p.m. with the u.s. in the unbreakable is week we're featuring some of booktv's we can programs on prime time here on c-span2. tonight former iraq and afghanistan general begins at 8 p.m. eastern with stanley mcchrystal and then fred kaplan, david petraeus, also jeffrey engel discusses a collection of essays on the goal for. >> the economy is at china basin is communism in name only these days. it's to preserve the power of the members of the communist party. but they basically threw most of the ideology aside when deng xiaoping opened the country up and is now a capitalist haven. the communism in china, they talk the talk at great length of these party congresses about marxism, leninism, to do. it's all about preserving the party power economic as a country continues to grow because they threw aside the most vestiges of common is alongside the in north korea it's all about preserving the power of the military and the kim dynasty as you have there. and again, i
shock when he saw with the final cost will be. 11 aircraft carriers and task force china has one carrier and that is from the ukraine navy i don't know how they feel about serving on this aircraft carrier but that is what they have. they have over 200 bases and facilities nothing outside of china itself. the marines are larger and more powerful than the british military. when is the last time they conducted the landing the degette a lot of their support for? 1951, the courier and war that they had, they were talking about an expeditionary fighting vehicle. they are getting enough 35 and that is another thing about what we do. every service has its own air force so in addition, you have the army, the navy, the marine corps that has their own capability in terms of the air force. finally, you have the army structure at 547,000. you could save a couple hundred billion dollars over the next ten years by reducing that to a reasonable 360,000. so those are just some of the things that could be done that could get you to the trillion dollar figure that some people would say would disarm the uni
the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean to keep the world's energy market stable. now this has been helped quite significantly by the increase in our own domestic production. it's no accident that is as the iranian oil has gone off-line because of our sanctions other sources have come on line so iran cannot in a fit from increased prices. then there is human rights and our support for democracy and the rule of law. levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. in the last century the united states where it led the world in recognizing universal rights exist and that governments are obligated to protect them. now we have placed ourselves at the frontline of today's emerging battle like the fight to defend the human rights of the lgbt communities around the world and religious minorities wherever and whoever they are. but it not a coincidence that virtually every country that threatens regional and global peace is a place where human rights are in peril or the rule of law as we. more specifically places where women and girls are treated as second-class marginal human beings.
that it will consider fines and other trade actions against china or any other country guilty of cyber espionage. we will continue to follow that story and bring you any remarks that may come out from administration officials today. the supreme court is expected to hear arguments in late march in two prominent cases that could test the bounds of laws restricting gay marriage. authors of "recently released book some day marriage recently debated the issue at harvard university. it is and about how to by the federalist society at harvard. this is one hour. >> thank you. richard fallon is the junior professor of constitutional law at harvard law school. he also earned a ba degree from oxford university, where he was a rhodes scholar. he served as a law clerk to justices of the united states supreme court and has written extensively about constitutional and federal courts law. he is the author of several books. we are very grateful for him for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago an
the sequester would result the communism of china is coming to name these days and it preserves the power of the members of the communist party but they basically through most ideology aside whether he opened the country up and is now become a capitalist haven, the communism now in china they talked at great length that the congress is about marxist lennon etc. but it's all about preserving the party's power economically as the country continues to grow because they threw aside most vestiges of communism a long time ago. and north korea, it's all about preserving the power of the military and the kim dynasty and it has nothing to do with what karl marx vision of communism way back. it's a fascinating book somehow on how communism when it moved into asia it diverged into something different in vietnam, cambodia, north korea, and the communism that appeared in europe and eastern european countries that is an absolutely fascinating split that occurred now the public affairs channel and the magazine hosted a discussion on u.s.-canadian relations. speakers include the canadian ambassador to th
to resolve energy disputes from the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean to keep the world's energy market stable. now this has been helped quite significantly by the increase in their own domestic production. it's no accident that is iranian oil has gone off-line because of our sanctions other sources have come on line so iran cannot and if it from increased prices. then there is human rights and our support for democracy and the rule of law, levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. in the last century the united states led the world in recognizing that universal rights exist and that governments are obligated to protect them. now we have placed ourselves at the front lines of today's emerging battles like the fight to defend the human rights of the lgbt communities around the world and religious minorities wherever and whoever they are. but it's not a coincidence that virtually every country that threatens regional and global peace is a place where human rights are in peril or the rule of law is weak. more specifically, places where women and girls are treated as sec
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)